Resource

Evidence-Based Practice and its Impact on Organizational Performance

Evidence-Based Practice and its Impact on Organizational Performance - DVD

Principal Investigator: Gregory, Kelly B.

DVD Description

30 second preview

Purchase This Training:
DVD for $25
(with an option for CEUs for an additional $15)
Web Training for $25
(with cost of CEUs included)

Service providers, from individual clinicians to state agencies, are considering implementing evidence-based practices as their primary means of service delivery. In this module, Dr. Hovmand looks beyond the decision to implement evidence-based practices to the impact of that decision on the performance of an organization. He also discusses the mechanisms used to conduct his research.

Release Date:
8/1/2007

Duration:
28 minutes

Presenter:
Peter Hovmand, PhD Peter Hovmand, PhD is Assistant Professor of Social Work at the George Warren Brown School of Social Work at Washington University in St. Louis. He has his PhD from Michigan State University. His primary research interest is in services systems in organizational performance. He also does research in domestic violence.

Accreditation
The University of Missouri, Missouri Institute of Mental Health will be responsible for this program and will maintain a record of your continuing education credits earned. MIMH will award 1 clock hour or 1.2 contact hours (.1 CEU) for this program. MIMH credit will fulfill Clinical Social Work and Psychologist licensure requirements in the State of Missouri. Attendees with licensure from other states are responsible for seeking appropriate continuing education credit, from their respective boards for completing this program.

License information for Missouri residents: http://pr.mo.gov/professions.asp

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